The Only Thing Worse Than Being Talked About

Is being talked about in a court decision that’s available online for all to see. At least if you’ve sued a former employer, and are looking for a new job. At the Volokh Conspiracy, Eugene Volokh reports on a case in which a man who believes he lost employment opportunities because prospective employers found out about his lawsuit against a previous employer sued companies providing both general internet search and specialized legal databases for making available online materials relating to that litigation. The complaint alleged violations of a variety of statutory and common law rules, but the court dismissed all these claims. The court added that publication of matters of public record, such as court proceedings and materials is, in any event, constitutionally protected.

I think that, in these circumstances, the outcome would be the same in Canada. I cannot see how the publication of court materials, unless the court itself ordered them to remain confidential, can amount to a common law tort; nor am I aware of any statutes that would prohibit it regardless of the circumstances (more on limited exceptions shortly). The constitutional situation is a bit different, since the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms does not directly apply to the common law, though it would apply to a statute.  That difference wouldn’t matter here.

In any case, what concerns me right now is not the current legal situation or the question, which prof. Volokh addresses, whether there “is an adequate justification for suppressing speech about legal documents that have been released by the courts as a public record.” (His response is negative, and I think he is right.) It is the antecedent question whether any and all legal documents should be made matters of public record.

Generally speaking, our legal system favours publicity. The publicity of judicial proceedings helps ensure the impartiality, and perhaps also the quality, of judicial work. As with other branches of government, publicity is important for accountability. Closed, secret, or inaccessible courts are a hallmark of authoritarian political systems. In Edmonton Journal v. Alberta (Attorney General), [1989] 2 S.C.R. 1326, the Supreme Court has held that the openness of court proceedings, including the ability of the media to report on them, is an important constitutional value.

Important, but not absolute. The usual presumption of publicity can be overturned in particular cases, where the disclosure of elements of the evidence, normally a matter of public record, may compromise the impartiality of the proceedings (for example by influencing potential jurors) or reveal privileged information, such as commercial secrets. Such cases are regarded as exceptional; importantly, a party who wants the court to make some element of the case confidential has to ask the court to do so, which can be expensive and which many will not think of doing. (For example, refugee claimants rarely ask that their cases before the Immigration and Refugee Board or the Federal Court be anonymized, although if memory serves well, they are entitled to do so.)

But there are also some categorical rules which apply automatically, without a party having to do anything. At issue in Edmonton Journal was one such rule, prohibiting the publication of all sorts of details about family law cases. The Supreme Court held that the law was much too restrictive and thus an unconstitutional restriction of the freedom of expression. But narrower restrictions exist. For instance the names of minors involved in criminal cases are not published – the defendants are known by their initials. And in Québec, family law cases are identified by a number, rather than the name of the parties, with the names of the parties and the places where they live being replaced by initials in the court’s reasons (incidentally, the Alberta statute in Edmonton Journal allowed the publication of these details; Québec’s rule is essentially its mirror image).

The idea – and I think it is a sound one – seems to be that (many of) the positive effects of publicity can result from publishing the court’s decision but not the parties’ names. From the perspective of keeping the courts accountable, the publication of the parties’ names probably matters little; what is important is that journalists, lawyers, and interested citizens know what evidence was before the court and what the court did with it. On the other hand, there is also a legitimate public interest in knowing what is happening to whom, or who exactly is involved in stories that attract attention.

And now I’m coming back to the case I considered at the beginning of the post. So long as access to court materials, or even to judgments, was time-consuming, difficult and expensive, it mattered little that publicity was the rule in most cases. Realistically, only news media would bother accessing these records, and then only in a few cases which attracted sufficient attention to make the effort and expense worthwhile. The internet changes that. It is fairly easy, and relatively cheap or even free, to find materials (at least judgments) from any case one is interested in. Indeed, one need not even know there is a case. It is enough to google someone’s name to find court decisions involving that person. An employer who would not have gone to the courthouse to rummage through files just to see if a prospective employee had ever been involved in litigation can find this out in a matter of seconds from the comfort of his office. Indeed, he may find it accidentally – he might google an applicant’s name without the intention of finding out about the applicant’s litigation history, looking for something else – but that just comes up. However the information comes out, it can be very – and unfairly – damaging, As prof. Volokh points out,

[m]any employers would likely be wary of hiring someone who had sued a past employer, because they might view this as a sign of possible litigiousness. Even if the earlier lawsuit was eminently well-founded, a prospective employer might not take the time and effort to investigate this, but might just move on to the next candidate, especially if [the candidate] is one of several comparably well-credentialed candidates for the same spot.

So here are some questions. Does our general presumption of publicity of court materials still make sense in this new reality that the internet has brought about? Or should we re-balance free speech and privacy, perhaps by making anonymization the default rule? If so, should we make exceptions? A blanket anonymity rule might be problematic, because there are cases where knowing who is involved is very much in the public interest. But are exceptions workable? If not, does this mean we should abandon anonymity after all?

I don’t have answers to these questions. I would love to hear from you.

Google, Speaker and Censor

Some recent stories highlight Google’s ambiguous role as provider and manager of content, which, from a free-speech perspective, puts at it at once in the shoes of both a speaker potentially subject to censorship and an agent of the censors.

The first of these is an interesting exchange between Eugene Volokh, of UCLA and the Volokh Conspiracy, and Tim Wu, of Harvard. Back in April, prof. Volokh and a lawyer from California, Donald Falk, published a “White Paper” commissioned by Google, arguing that search results produced by Google and its competitors are covered by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects freedom of speech. The crux of their argument is that “search engines select and sort the results in a way that is aimed at giving users what the search engine companies see as the most  helpful and useful information” (3). This is an “editorial judgment,” similar to other editorial judgments – that of a newspaper publisher selecting and arranging news stories, letters from readers, and editorials, or a guidebook editor choosing which restaurants or landmarks to include and review and which to omit. The fact that the actual selecting and sorting of the internet search results is done by computer algorithms rather by human beings is of no import. It “is necessary given the sheer volume of information that search engines must process, and given the variety of queries that users can input,” but technology does not matter: the essence of the decision is the same whether it is made by men or by machines (which, in any event, are designed and programmed by human engineers with editorial objectives in mind).

In a recent op-ed in the New York Times, prof. Wu challenges the latter claim. For him, it matters a lot whether we are speaking of choices made by human beings or by computers. Free speech protections are granted to people, sentient beings capable of thought and opinion. Extending them to corporations is disturbing, and doing so to machines would be a mistake.

As a matter of legal logic, there is some similarity among Google, [a newspaper columnist], Socrates and other providers of answers. But if you look more closely, the comparison falters. Socrates was a man who died for his views; computer programs are utilitarian instruments meant to serve us. Protecting a computer’s “speech” is only indirectly related to the purposes of the First Amendment, which is intended to protect actual humans against the evil of state censorship.

And it does not matter that computer algorithms are designed by humans. A machine can no more “inherit” the constitutional rights of its creator than Dr. Frankenstein’s monster.

Prof. Volokh responds to the arguments in a blog post. He thinks it is a mistake to treat the intervention of the algorithm as an entirely new event that breaks the constitutional protection to which editorial decisions of human beings are entitled. The algorithms  are only tools; their decisions are not autonomous, but reflect the choices of their designers. To the extent that similar choices by human beings are prohibited or regulated, they remain so if made by computers; but to the extent they are constitutionally protected – and it is a large one – the interposition of an algorithm should not matter at all.

This is only a bare-bones summary of the arguments; they are worth a careful reading. Another caveat is that the constitutional analysis might be somewhat different in Canada, since our law is somewhat less protective of free speech than its American counterpart. However, I do not think that these differences, however significant they are in some cases, would or should matter here.

The argument prof. Volokh articulates on Google’s behalf reflects its concern about having its own speech regulated. That concern is one it shares with the traditional media to which prof. Volokh repeatedly compares it. But Google is also different from traditional media, in that it serves as a host or conduit to all manner of content which it neither created nor even vetted. It is different too in being (almost) omnipresent, and thus subject to the regulation and pressure of governments the world over. For this reason, is often asked to act as an agent of the regulators or censors of the speech of others to which it links or which its platforms host – and, as much as it presents itself as a speaker worried about censorship of its own speech, it often enough accepts. It provides some of the details – numbers mostly, and a selection of examples – in its “Transparency Report.” To be sure, much of the content that Google accepts to remove is, in one way or another, illegal – for example defamatory, or contrary to hate speech legislation. And as a private company, Google does not necessarily owe it to anyone to link to or host his or her content. Still, when its decisions not to do so are motivated not by commercial considerations, but by requests of government agencies – and not necessarily courts, but police and other executive agencies too – its position becomes more ambiguous. For example, one has to wonder whether there is a risk of a conflict of interest between its roles as speaker and censors’ agent – whether it will not be tempted to trade greater compliance with the regulators’ demands when it comes to others’ content for greater leeway when it comes to its own.

En Français S.V.P./In English Please

In 2008, the Township of Russel, just outside Ottawa, passed a by-law requiring any new commercial sign to be bilingual. An angry activist and a shopkeeper challenged the validity of the by-law. The Court of Appeal for Ontario has rejected their challenge, in Galganov v. Russel (Township), 2012 ONCA 409, released last Friday.

Before getting to the challenge itself, the court addressed the preliminary issue of Howard Galganov’s standing to bring it. Mr. Galganov neither lives nor carries on a business in the township, and is not personally affected by the by-law. At common law, he does not have standing. But subs. 273(1) of Ontario’s Municipal Act, S.O. 2001 c. 25, provides that an illegal by-law can be quashed on application of “any person”. That’s great, says the court, but “any person” isn’t just any person. “The words ‘any person’ in s. 273(1) of the Act mean ‘any person who has standing under the common law relating to standing'” (par. 15). The old presumption that legislation will not be intepreted to depart from the common law unless clear language indicates that it does still has some life in it.

Be that as it may, another applicant, Jean-Serge Brisson, has a shop in the township, which carries a unilingual French sign, so there is no question about his standing to challenge the by-law. His first claim was that the by-law was ultra vires the township, essentially because the Municipal Act does not include an explicit grant of power over language to municipalities. The court rejected that submission, saying that these days, grants of powers to municipalities are broad and general, and there is no need to look for such a specific authorization as Mr. Brisson claimed was necessary, and holding that the by-law at issue was authorized by par. 11(2)(5) of the Municipal Act, which provides municipalities with the power to make by-laws “respecting the … [e]conomic, social and environmental well-being of the municipality.” Mr. Brisson argued

that, instead of promoting the economic or social well-being of the municipality, the By-law detracts from it.  This argument is based on the supposition that a commercial establishment with a bilingual exterior sign signals that it will be able to serve customers in both languages.  If a commercial unilingual English establishment is compelled to post an exterior bilingual sign, customers will be misled and upset if they cannot be served in French (par. 33).

The court gave this claim short shrift, on the ground that it was not supported by evidence; indeed, there was expert evidence to the contrary. Actually, one can question whether it is the court’s role to venture on such an inquiry at all. No court would question whether an act of Parliament really tended to promote the “Peace, Order, and good Government of Canada” – it is enough that Parliament thinks it does. However, Parliament is sovereign within the competence defined by division of powers provisions of the Constitution Act, 1867, and subject to the Charter. A municipality only exercises limited delegated powers, so courts are justified in ascertaining whether municipal by-laws are within the bounds of the delegation. The problem here is that delegation is so vast that its terms cannot be policed without the courts’ inquiring into the wisdom of the legislation, which is something courts are not very good at, and ought to be (though perhaps they are not) uncomfortable with doing.

Mr. Brisson’s second claim was that the by-law was unconstitutional because it contravened the Charter‘s protection of freedom of expression. Following the Supreme Court’s decision in Ford v. Québec, [1988] 2 S.C.R. 712, which struck down Québec’s prohibition on commercial signs in languages other than French, the court accepted that the by-law did infringe freedom of expression as guaranteed by s. 2(b) of the Charter. However, it held that the by-law was saved by s. 1 of the Charter. Its objective, “the promotion of the equality of status of both French and English,” is pressing and substantial, and it is rationally connected to the objective. As usual, the real question is that of proportionality. Apparently, Mr. Brisson’s main argument on this point was that the by-law prevented people from having signs in a language other than French or English. But the by-law does no such thing, the court points out. “Persons engaged in commerce can use any language of their choice along with French and English (par. 80). Indeed it is rather shocking that much Mr. Brisson and his lawyers placed much reliance on this claim.

The court went on to add that “in the past, Brisson has chosen to express himself only in English; he now chooses to express himself only in French on his exterior sign while continuing to employ English in other aspects of his business. To require him to employ English on his sign in addition to French is a minimal impairment of his right to freedom of expression” (par. 83). That, it seems to me, is bad reasoning. What does it matter that Mr. Brisson chose to express himself in English in the past, if now he wants to express himself in French only? The court seems to be questioning his good faith, or to be contradicting its own holding that his freedom of expression has been infringed. But that is not its role. It has nothing to do with answering the question that the case actually raises: does forcing shopkeepers to express themselves in French and English, whether they want to or not, the least restrictive means open to the township of achieving its pressing and substantial objective of promoting the equality of status between French and English. The court’s judgment, in my view, does not actually answer that question.

More about Election Law

There are two things to mention today, both related to election law, and more specifically to restrictions on “third-party” speech in the pre-electoral context.

First, Radio-Canada reports that Québec’s Chief Electoral Officer has been in touch with the leaders of the student organizations who are protesting the tuition fee hikes announced by the provincial government. The protesters are angry at Premier Jean Charest and the Québec Liberal Party and have made no secret of their desire to help defeat them when the next election is called – there was speculation that it might happen this spring, but the fall now seems more likely. Well, as I have argued in an op-ed that Cyberpresse published in mid-April, the expenses the protesters will incur during an eventual election campaign will be covered – and severely limited, indeed almost to the point of being prohibited – by the draconian third-party spending provisions of Québec’s Election Act. Radio-Canada quotes the Chief Electoral Officer’s spokesperson as saying that the “objective was not to prevent [the protesters] from expressing themselves. The goal was to make sure that they comply with the law.” The trouble is, the effect of the law will be to prevent the protesters from expressing their views. As I said here already, Québec’s law was intended to prevent the rich from capturing the democratic process, but operates to silence not only the rich, but also those who are not well-off, while shielding the incumbent politicians from criticism by political outsiders.

And second, NYU’s Richard A. Epstein has an interesting (albeit asininely entitled) essay responding to Jeffrey Toobin’s story of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision. As before,  I will avoid discussing the merits of the Citizens United decision itself (though I find prof. Epstein’s essay well-argued, as I did a lecture he gave at NYU in September 2010; at least, a good criticism of Citizens United would need to address the points prof. Epstein makes). I want to mention, however, that prof. Epstein is skeptical of the distinction that Mr. Toobin sought to make between “electioneering” by means of TV advertisements and books. He writes that

Toobin … fights against modern technology when he seeks to draw a hard and fast line between “the pervasive influence of television advertising on electoral politics” and books that operate “in a completely different way,” given that individuals have to make an “affirmative choice to acquire and read a book.”

Oh? Thanks to the internet, books can be excerpted and transmitted in a thousand different ways online to consumers who need only a single click to ignore messages they don’t like. Given the vast reduction in cost in the production of information, it seems positively odd to ban, or even regulate, one form of dissemination while allowing other forms to survive unregulated.

His conclusion, of course, is not that we should censor books, but that we should not restrict other forms of “electioneering” either. That’s pretty much what I argued in my previous post on this topic. The distinction between books and TV ads is not obvious, and indeed probably not tenable. Canadian election legislation makes it, exempting (some) books from its application, but it is not a principled distinction. The principle underlying our law would in fact allow censorship of books (indeed it already allows censorship of some books, as I explained), and that suggests that this principle is misguided.

UPDATE: The Globe also has a story about the Chief Electoral Officer’s warning to student organizations. It emphasizes limits on individual contributions to electoral campaigns, but I think this emphasis is misplaced. The real problem is not with contribution limits, but with those on third-party spending.

Can Canada Ban Books?

The New Yorker has published an interesting, albeit tendentious, as The Volokh Conspiracy’s Jonathan Adler explainsaccount by Jeffrey Toobin of the notorious Citizens United decision of the U.S. Supreme Court, which struck down limits on corporations’ spending on pre-electoral advertising. According to Mr. Toobin, the key to Supreme Court’s engagement with the  case was a question asked by Justice Alito: while the law at issue applied to “electronic communications” – first and foremost television – could its constitutional rationale also apply to justify prohibitions on appeals to vote for or against a candidate published in a book? Could the government censor books published by corporations (that would be all of them) in the pre-electoral period if they contained “electioneering”? The U.S. government’s lawyer said it could.

The Justices leaned forward. It was one thing for the government to regulate television commercials. That had been done for years. But a book? Could the government regulate the content of a book?

“That’s pretty incredible,” Alito responded. “You think that if a book was published, a campaign biography that was the functional equivalent of express advocacy, that could be banned?”

It is at that moment that the case became one about censorship generally, rather than the specific and unusual circumstances actually at issue.

The trouble is, Mr. Toobin contends, the lawyer “was wrong. Congress could not ban a book. [The law at issue] was based on the pervasive influence of television advertising on electoral politics, the idea that commercials are somehow unavoidable in contemporary American life. The influence of books operates in a completely different way. Individuals have to make an affirmative choice to acquire and read a book. Congress would have no reason, and no justification, to ban a book under the First Amendment.” Prof. Adler argues that it is Mr. Toobin who is mistaken. “[T]he government,” he observes, “never sought to defend the law on the basis that it was limited to electronic media. After all, the point of the was to limit the role of money in campaigns, not limit television advertising. The position the government was defending was that Congress could limit corporate expenditures related to campaigns, not that it could regulate TV.”

My purpose is not to dwell on the rights or wrongs of Citizens United, but to look at the way the issue raised by Justice Alito plays out in Canadian election law. Par. 319(b) of the Canada Elections Act exempts “the distribution of a book, or the promotion of the sale of a book, for no less than its commercial value, if the book was planned to be made available to the public regardless of whether there was to be an election” from its definition of “election advertising” which it sharply restricts. Québec’s Election Act contains a similar qualified exception in subs. 404(2). So, since the exemptions are qualified to only apply to books published “regardless of whether there was to be an election,” books published with a view to an upcoming election, or books the publication of which has been accelerated to coincide with an electoral campaign, would not be exempt. Overrunning the spending limits (which are exceedingly low federally, and even more so in Québec) on publishing and promoting them would be an offence, as would be not reporting these activities to election regulators. Is this the sort of restrictions on the freedom of expression we are prepared to live with?

But prof. Adler’s argument points to a still more serious problem. Even the qualified exemptions now existing do not sit easily with the rationales for the regulation of and restrictions on election spending, especially by actors other than political parties, which the Supreme Court of Canada embraced in Libman v. Quebec (Attorney General), [1997] 3 S.C.R. 569 and Harper v. Canada (Attorney General), 2004 SCC 33, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 827. Those rationales are that non-party voices must be muffled, if not quite silenced, in the pre-electoral debate, lest political parties have trouble being heard, and that the influence of money ought to be reduced, if not quite eliminated. The exemption for books seems to run counter to these purposes. Could Parliament and provincial legislatures abolish it if they felt like it? Quite possibly. Doing so would, I have argued, be rationally connected to the overall objectives of election spending regulation. It is harder to guess whether it would be held to be a “minimal impairment” of freedom of expression, and whether the courts would find that its salutary effects will outweigh the deleterious ones, but if the prohibition on publishing an ad in a national newspaper has been upheld (in Harper, as the dissenting judgment points out), why not that on a book? Once again, isn’t there something wrong with our approach to freedom of expression in the pre-electoral context if it countenances prohibitions of this sort?

Rants and Freedoms

Some university students think the lecturer whose class they are taking is doing a lousy job. Someone creates a hyperbolically-named Facebook group to rant; others join; a few post derogatory messages on the group’s wall. So far, so normal. But, after the semester ends and the lecturer, for reasons unknown, is no longer employed by the university, she somehow learns of the Facebook group, and complains to the university’s authorities. A kangaroo court is held, and finds the members of the group ― including those who posted no messages at all, and those whose messages were quite innocuous ― guilty of “non-academic misconduct.” Some of the students are required to write an apology letter to the former lecturer and put on probation. An appeal to a higher university instance is fruitless, and the university’s Board of Governors refuses to hear a further appeal. Judicial review and an appeal ensue.

That’s the scary story of Keith and Steven Pridgen, (former) students at the University of Calgary, whose right to rant the Alberta Court of Appeal vindicated in a recent decision. One has to hope that it will serve as a lesson for professors and university administrators (as well as teachers and school principals) in the future. Students, in case such people forget, have always ranted about their professors, and always will. It’s not always nice, and it’s not always fair; get over it. (This is, as much as anything else, a note to self as an aspiring academic.) The fact that rants now leave a digital record does not change anything, it seems to me: just because they used to circulate (and of course still circulate) by word of mouth, rants were no less pervasive and durable in the past. Stories about professors are handed over from one cohort of students to the next; they are an ineradicable part of university’s environment.

Legally, the Alberta Court of Appeal is interesting in a number of ways. Each of the three judges wrote a separate opinion. They all agree in finding the university’s decision unreasonable  and hence invalid on administrative law grounds, because the university’s decision bore little, if any, relationship with the evidence it ought to have been based on ― evidence of harm to the lecturer, or of the specific actions of each accused student. Justice O’Ferrall also finds that the utter failure to consider the students’ free speech rights contributes to making the decision unreasonable. The judges disagree, however, on whether to address the other issue debated by the parties (and several interveners) – the applicability of the Charter, and its guarantee of freedom of expression.

Justice Paperny thinks the question deserves to be addressed, since it was debated at length by the parties and is important; her colleagues disagree, because it is not necessary to the resolution of the case (since it can be resolved on administrative law grounds) and important constitutional questions should not be addressed unless it is necessary to do so. Both arguments have merit; I’m not sure on whose side I would have come out if I had to vote. Justice Paperny devotes much of her opinion to arguing that the Charter does indeed apply to universities, at least in their disciplinary dealings with their students. Her review of the case law is comprehensive, her argument about the universities’ and the government’s roles in contemporary society sometimes sweeping. And it is persuasive (and Justice Paperny’s colleagues, one senses, do not actually disagree with its substance).

One final thought. The court did not pause to consider whether the university even had the power to punish students for something they wrote on Facebook. Yet it seems to me that it’s a crucial jurisdictional question. (Needless to say, the university did not consider it either.) I can see why a university might be interested in what is being said in its lecture halls, or online on forums it maintains (in connection with courses for example). It does have an interest in maintaining a welcoming, respectful learning environment, although arguably this interest does not play out in the same way as a school’s, since everyone at a university is an adult and is there by choice. But does this interest give a university the right to police the conduct of its students off-campus or online? I think not; but in any case, it’s too bad the court did not ask itself the question.

Life is Wasted Without Freedom

A high school student, William Swinimer, is now suspended from his school in Nova Scotia for wearing a t-shirt with the words ‘Life is wasted without Jesus’, the CBC reports. Some people apparently find that offensive. The CBC quotes the school board’s superintendent as saying that  “[w]hen one is able or others are able to interpret it as, ‘If you don’t share my belief then your life is wasted,’ that can be interpreted by some as being inappropriate.” The authorities are now apparently trying to find a “compromise” of some sort. In the meantime, the politicians have jumped in, with the education Minister supporting the school board, and the opposition critical.

Well, at the risk of offending the bleeding hearts of Nova Scotia’s education establishment, I want to say that life is wasted without freedom. And if you can’t stand the sight of an idea that you find offensive, kindly go on and bleed. It is remarkable that in 2012 it is still necessary to insist on and to fight for the recognition of the principle that freedom of expression cannot be conditional on the failure of those who see or hear a statement to take offence. If that were the condition, no statement would be protected from censorship. I, for instance, take offence at politicians and bureaucrats denying my and my fellow-citizens’ rights. (I mean it. I do find it offensive.) What then? All I can do is try to persuade people, as I am trying to persuade you, that they are wrong. What is it that could give me the right to force them to shut up?

But, they will say, their case is different because they are public officials. They have a job to do. They must preserve a nice cozy learning environment in schools, or something like that. There a couple of things to say to that.

First, if school is going to be more than a rote-learning factory, and serve to prepare people for the outside world, it is silly to want to it to be free from any controversial ideas, including claims that some ways of living are better than others. This is especially so in high school, where the students can be expected to have the maturity to deal with unpleasant and critical ideas. If it is ok to suppress such ideas in school, is it also ok in university? Why not? There’s a learning environment to foster there, and lots of bleeding hearts who might get offended. Should we summarily fire all the ethicists and political philosophers, most law professors, and countless others who are in the business of telling people that some ways of living are better than others? Or is it enough to just prohibit normative scholarship in curricula?

And second, schools are not, in fact, free from controversial ideas and value judgments. They teach – well I hope they still do – literature for example, which is full of ideas on how one ought, and how one ought not, to live. If in a discussion of Hamlet, a student expresses the view that hesitation, reflection, and soliloquies are for weaklings, should he be suspended because the less resolute, or more prudent, of his classmates find that kind of claim offensive? Or should Hamlet just not be taught, lest it give some “insensitive” kids the occasion for offending their classmates?

Censoring offence out of existence is never going to work. But attempts to do so will stand in the way of talking about not only religion, but philosophy, politics, and art. It will make the world a very boring place indeed. Life is wasted without freedom.