Undue Spiritual Influence

One of the most fascinating cases ever decided by the Supreme Court of Canada is one that you have never heard about ― or at any rate hadn’t heard about until two weeks ago, if you read Yves Boisvert’s account of it in La Presse. The case is Brassard v. Langevin, (1876-77) 1 S.C.R. 145 ― one of the very first decisions by the then-newly-created Supreme Court. It dealt with a challenge to the outcome of a by-election that had been held in January 1876 in the riding of Charlevoix. The Conservative candidate, Hector-Louis Langevin (for whom the Langevin block on Parliament Hill is named) had narrowly defeated the Liberal Pierre-Alexis Tremblay. But Tremblay’s supporters challenged the result because, they said, the local clergy’s campaign in favour of Langevin amounted to undue influence on the voters. Unanimously, the Supreme Court agreed.

One reason the case is so fascinating is simply the vividness with which it presents the entanglement of religion and politics in Québec in the late 19th century. Langevin only agreed to run for the Conservatives after having been assured of the clergy’s support ― and he got the full measure of it. Bishops had sent out a pastoral letter, to be read by the parish priests shortly before the election, defending the Church’s right to concern itself with politics and denouncing the dangers of Catholic Liberalism:

The Church is not only independent of civil society, but is superior to it by her origin, by her comprehensiveness and by her end. (152)

The people have, therefore, no greater enemies than those men who want to banish religion from politics, for under the pretence of freeing the people from what they call priest tyranny, priest’s undue influence, they are preparing, for the same people, the heaviest chains, and the most difficult to throw off : they put might above right, and they take from the civil power the only moral restraint which can stop it from degenerating into despotism and tyranny! (153-54)

The priests’ sermons echoed the bishops’ letter:

Is it not true that on your death-bed you would reproach yourselves bitterly if your conscience should upbraid you for having contributed, by your vote, to the election of men who wish to separate the Church from the State, and who are working to destroy the confidence which you are to have in the priest? (160)

And though a priest might claim to have “no party but that of good principles” (161), the partisanship was not disguised:

[O]ur chief pastors … do not wish to warn you against phantoms, but, indeed, against Liberalism and its partizans … You shall see men having outward appearances of piety and religion allow themselves to be fascinated without suspecting it, by the deceitful words of the serpent Catholic Liberal. … Be firm, my brethren, our Bishops tells us that it is no longer permitted to be conscientiously a Catholic Liberal ; be careful never to taste the fruit of the tree Catholic Liberal. (160-61)

The question such sermons presented for the Court is interesting too: the clergy claimed that they were entitled to speak out, no less than ordinary citizens were. They were exercising the freedoms of religion and of speech, which British and Canadian law protected. On the other hand, as the appellants’ lawyer pointed out, to allow the Church effectively to bar candidates it deemed insufficiently orthodox from being elected to Parliament would be to circumvent Parliament’s policy to abolish religious tests for office. And so, “[t]he question is, after all, which policy is to be supreme, the Church or Parliament?” (173-74) Parliament, the judges pointed out, had chosen to make elections free of undue influence. There was, therefore ― then as now ― a balance to be struck between competing claims; so Justice Taschereau:

I admit, without the least hesitation, and with the most sincere conviction, the right of the Catholic priest as to preaching to the definition of dogmas and of all points of discipline; I deny that he has, in this case or in any other similar case, the right to point to an individual or a political party and hold them up to public indignation, by accusing them of Catholic Liberalism or of any other equally grievous irregularity, and, above all, to say that he who should help in the election of such individual would commit a grievous sin. (196)

The respondents ― and the elements of the Church which they represented ― overplayed their hand. They claimed a complete immunity for the Church from all challenge in civil courts. If, they said, someone is aggrieved at what a priest has said, he ought to complain to ecclesiastical authorities, not to a civil court. Justice Taschereau fumed at the suggestion:

[L]et us say a word as to the ecclesiastical tribunal of which the Respondent invokes the jurisdiction as exclusive, and I ask myself where is that tribunal to be found in Canada. For me it is invisible, intangible, non-existent in this country … If this tribunal exists, I am not aware that it has any code of law or of procedure … And if it existed, it would be very singular to see the Jew seeking, at the hands of a Catholic Bishop, the justice he can claim from civil tribunals, and submitting to a corporal punishment adjudged by that tribunal, and the same might be said of any other individual belonging to a different religion. … All are equal before that law, which declares that whosoever does injury to another must repair it, and indicates the means to be used to compel him to do so. (197)

Justice Taschereau, indeed, is himself a fascinating character in this drama. The brother of the Archbishop (and later Cardinal) of Québec, he opened his opinion by

acknowledg[ing] that it is with great misgivings as to my own powers, and with a deep feeling of regret that I find myself compelled to pronounce a decision as a Judge in a contestation of the nature of the present (188)

His opinion is visibly emotional, in contrast to the drier and more legalistic one of Justice Ritchie. It must have taken courage to write ― just as it must have taken a great deal of courage for the plaintiffs to pursue this case, and for the witnesses who came forward to describe the clergy’s campaign of insinuation and intimidation to risk oppose the will of the men who, they all believed, had their souls at their mercy.

This is just a flavour of the case. I really recommend reading the whole thing. Here it is.

Brassard v Langevin, (1876-77) 1 SCR 145

Voice after Exit, European Edition

I wrote last year about a court challenge by two Canadian citizens living in the United States to a  provision of the Canada Elections Act, S.C. 2000 c. 9 (CEA), which prohibits Canadians who have resided abroad for more than five consecutive years (except members of the Canadian forces, civil servants, diplomats, and employees of international organization) from voting in federal elections. (The applicants or their lawyers have set up a website documenting their case, on which they have made available their application, affidavits, and exhibits ― which I think is a very commendable thing to do in a public interest case like this; a more general website advocating voting rights for Canadians abroad is here.)

In Charter cases such as this, courts often refer to the law of other countries, particularly when deciding whether a limitation of Charter rights is “demonstrably justifiable in a free and democratic society” and so constitutional pursuant to s. 1 of the Charter. So a recent decision of the European Court of Human Rights on this issue is worth commenting on.

The Court was faced with a challenge by Harry Shindler, a British citizen resident in Italy to legislation disenfranchising citizens who have lived abroad for more than 15 years. Whatever the situation of expatriates might have been in the past, Mr. Shindler argued, it is now easy for citizens living abroad to remain in contact with and engaged with the affairs of their home country. In his own case, he receives a pension from the U.K., pays taxes there, and is an active member of a number of British organizations. And he remains, of course, entitled to return to the U.K. at any time. The U.K. government, however, claimed that the ties between an expat and his home country wither over time, and that the small number of British citizens who register to vote overseas supports this contention. Although some citizens retain strong ties with their home country, it would be impracticable to premise the right to vote on each person’s engagement; a one-size-fits-all rule is necessary.

The Court found that, under the European Convention on Human Rights, the right to vote could be limited to further “any aim which is compatible with the principle of the rule of law and with the general objectives of the Convention” (par. 101). It also referred to its prior case law, in which it held that limiting expatriates’ voting rights was permissible. That is because

 first, the presumption that non-resident citizens were less directly or less continually concerned with their country’s day-to-day problems and had less knowledge of them; second, the fact that non-resident citizens had less influence on the selection of candidates or on the formulation of their electoral programmes; third, the close connection between the right to vote in parliamentary elections and the fact of being directly affected by the acts of the political bodies so elected; and fourth, the legitimate concern the legislature might have to limit the influence of citizens living abroad in elections on issues which, while admittedly fundamental, primarily affect persons living in the country (par. 105).

The court takes note of the social and technological changes that have made it easier for expatriates to retain their ties to their home countries. It also observes that various European bodies concerned with democratic rights have not (yet) concluded that countries were required to grant expatriates an unrestricted right to vote, although agreement that this was a good idea seemed to be emerging. And it holds, in somewhat conclusory fashion, that the disenfranchisement of expatriates after 15 years, “which is not an unsubstantial period of time” (par. 116), is not disproportionate to the government’s objective of ensuring that only those citizens with a sufficiently close connection to the U.K. be able to vote. An individualized assessment of a citizen’s ties to his home country would be too much of a burden to impose on the state.

I do not find this decision persuasive. The whole idea of expatriates otherwise lacking interest in the affairs of their home country suddenly showing up to vote strikes me as quite fanciful. The fact that few British citizens abroad register to vote may or may not suggest that most expatriates do not care, but it certainly suggests that those who do not care will not bother with voting. It is only the committed (few) who will take the trouble. The alleged objective of the disenfranchisement of expatriates is, in my view, nothing more than a post hoc dressing up of an old prejudice, no longer warranted if it ever was. One could also argue that the distinction between residents and expatriates based on their assumed level of knowledge about politics is also likely to be illusory, or at least rather less significant than usually assumed, because of the serious problems of political ignorance that affect the democratic process of every country (which Ilya Somin frequently discusses on the Volokh Conspiracy). So while it is true that an individualized assessment of engagement as a qualification for voting would be very burdensome and perhaps impossible to administer objectively and impartially (though prof. Somin has argued for similar assessments of political knowledge as a condition for extending the franchise to minors), this is really beside the point. There is simply no good reason for the law to distinguish between resident citizens and expatriates, regardless of how that distinction might be implemented.

Before concluding, I want to mention one feature of the decision of the European Court of Human Rights that I find puzzling: the attention devoted to the right, or lack thereof, of people disenfranchised by their country of nationality for residing abroad to vote in elections in their country of residence. It seems to me that the right to vote does not attach only to a person, so that everyone ought to be able to vote somewhere―anywhere―but, so long as one is able to vote somewhere, there is no problem with denying him the vote elsewhere. A right to vote is a right to participate in the political life of a specific community. Being granted permission to participate in the life of another community cannot remedy one’s exclusion from that to which one always belonged (nor does denial of such a permission make the exclusion any worse).

However that may be, I retain the view that I expressed in my original post on this topic:

[T]he denial of this right to those living abroad looks perfectly arbitrary. As with the prisoners [whose disenfranchisement the Supreme Court held to be unconstitutional in  Sauvé v. Canada (Chief Electoral Officer), 2002 SCC 68, [2002] 3 S.C.R. 519], it is a judgment that they are not morally worthy to vote – and such judgments are not open to Parliament, according to Sauvé.

L’Occasion de se taire

J’ai écrit, l’an dernier, que le Directeur Général des Élections du Québec

envisage[ait] … de poursuivre Yves Michaud pour avoir fait publier dans le Devoir une publicité appelant les électeurs à défaire certains députés, de tous les principaux partis. Il leur en veut d’avoir voté, il y a douze ans, en faveur d’une motion de blâme à son endroit après qu’il eut fait une déclaration que tous les membres de l’Assemblée nationale avaient jugée antisémite. Or, l’article 413 de la Loi électorale interdit à quiconque n’est pas un agent officiel d’un candidat ou d’un parti d’engager, durant la campagne électorale, des dépenses visant à favoriser ou à défavoriser l’élection d’un candidat.

Selon ce rapporte La Presse, c’est maintenant chose faite. Le DGE réclame une amende de 5000$ contre M. Michaud, ainsi que des frais de quelque 1200$. M. Michaud, pour sa part, prévoit plaider non-coupable et prépare à son tour une poursuite (civile) contre le DGE pour « atteinte à la liberté d’expression et à l’honneur d’un citoyen ». Je vois mal, à vrai dire, comment cette demande pourrait réussir (ne serait-ce que parce que, si M. Michaud prévaut dans la cause pénale, il n’y aura pas eu d’atteinte à sa liberté d’expression, alors que s’il la perd, l’atteinte sera manifestement justifiée par la loi). Par contre, les dispositions qu’il est accusé d’avoir violées sont, selon moi, inconstitutionnelles.

Comme je l’écrivais dans mon premier billet sur le sujet, on n’est pas obligé d’aimer M. Michaud, mais ce n’est pas une raison pour le museler:

M. Michaud n’est certes pas très sympathique. Mais … là n’est pas la question. Si peu sympathique soit-il, est-il juste de lui interdire de s’exprimer en période électorale? Il est vrai, il a le droit de faire publier une lettre ouverte, ou encore de s’exprimer sur internet, à condition, dans les deux cas, de ne pas payer pour la transmission de son message. Mais internet, ce n’est pas encore pour tout le monde. Quant à publier une lettre ouverte, une homme odieux, ou un homme qui poursuit une vendetta essentiellement personnelle – et a fortiori celui qui, comme M. Michaud, est les deux – risque de ne pas s’attirer la sympathie d’une rédaction qui, après tout, dispose d’un espace limité pour publier le courrier des lecteurs.

Une opinion impopulaire peut être difficile à exprimer. Mais – c’est la beauté du système capitaliste – une opinion qu’un journal ne veut pas propager à ses frais peut quand même être diffusée, à titre de publicité payante. M. Michaud était donc prêt à payer pour faire diffuser son opinion impopulaire. Mais bien sûr, cette opinion, c’est que certains députés sont, selon les termes de sa publicité, « indignes d’être élus », il voulait la diffuser, justement, en période électorale. Ce que la loi lui interdit.

Quel est donc l’effet de cette interdiction dans ces circonstances? Ce n’est pas, je soupçonne, d’empêcher la richesse de subvertir le processus démocratique. La publicité a dû coûter quelques milliers de dollars à peine, elle étai dirigée contre des candidats des trois  principaux partis, elle ne visait ni à protéger les riches d’une redistribution de la richesse ni à s’attirer les faveurs du prochain gouvernement. C’est, plutôt, d’empêcher la diffusion d’un message qui est, à la fois, impopulaire et inextricablement lié à une élection. C’est de faire en sorte qu’un citoyen qui se sent attaqué par une décision des législateurs n’est pas libre de leur répliquer sur la place publique au moment où les autres citoyens, et donc les législateurs, sont les plus susceptibles de l’écouter.

Dans Libman c. Québec (Procureur général), [1997] 3 R.C.S. 569, la Cour suprême a invalidé la législation Québécoise qui empêchait les citoyens de payer pour s’exprimer dans le cadre de campagnes référendaires et électorales, mais a suggéré  que les dépenses engagées dans de telles circonstances pouvaient être limitées. Tant le Parlement que l’Assemblée nationale ont répondu à cette décision en adoptant des lois qui limitent les dépenses que peut engager un« tiers » ― c’est-à-dire quiconque n’est pas un candidat ou un parti politique―dans le cadre d’une campagne électorale. La limite fédérale est de 3 000$ dans une circonscription ou de 150 000$ à l’échelle nationale. Elle a été reconnue constitutionnelle par la Cour suprême dans  Harper c. Canada (Procureur général), [2004] 1 R.C.S. 827, 2004 CSC 33.

Or, la loi québécoise est beaucoup, beaucoup plus contraignante. D’abord, l’alinéa 13 de l’article 404 de la Loi électorale, L.R.Q. c. E-3.3, limite les dépenses « des intervenants particuliers » à la somme tout à fait risible de 300$. Ensuite, et surtout, la même disposition leur interdit de « favoriser [ou] défavoriser directement un candidat ou un parti ». Finalement, l’article 457.2 de la même loi dispose qu’une personne morale ― une corporation donc, mais aussi un syndicat ou une ONG organisée comme corporation, même à but non-lucratif ― ne peut devenir un « intervenant particulier ».

Selon moi, il s’agit de différences très considérables. Si considérables que, même en acceptant que la décision dans Harper était la bonne, les limites imposées par la Loi électorale sont inconstitutionnelles. La Cour d’appel du Québec a rejeté des arguments de la FTQ à cet effet, dans Métallurgistes unis d’Amérique, section locale 7649 (FTQ) c. Québec (Directeur général des élections), 2011 QCCA 1043. Malgré mon très grand respect pour la juge Duval-Hesler (tel était alors son titre), l’auteure de cette décision, pour qui j’ai eu l’honneur (et le plaisir) de travailler un peu, je pense qu’il s’agit d’une erreur. La Cour suprême ne s’est pas prononcée sur la question. J’espère que la cause de M. Michaud lui donnera l’occasion de le faire. Le législateur québécois estime que, pour les citoyens, une campagne électorale est une occasion de se taire. Dans un pays démocratique, c’est une idée intolérable.

La question à 100$

Radio-Canada rapporte les grandes lignes de la réforme de la Loi électorale québécoise, contenue dans le projet de loi 2 actuellement considéré par l’Assemblée nationale, sur lesquelles les partis politiques représentés à l’Assemblée nationale se seraient entendus. Le montant qu’un électeur pourra contribuer à un parti politique au cours d’une année sera diminué de 1000$ à 100$, avec une contribution additionnelle de 100$ autorisée lors d’une campagne électorale. Radio-Canada ajoute que “[d]es mesures seront cependant prises pour cette limite de 100 $ ne nuise pas à l’émergence de nouveaux partis,” mais ne précise pas en quoi ces mesures vont consister. Parallèlement, le financement public des partis politiques, calculé pour chaque parti en fonction du nombre de votes reçus à la dernière élection générale, va plus que doubler. Pour payer cette augmentation, le crédit d’impôt pour don à un parti politique sera aboli. Finalement, le montant que chaque parti est autorisé à dépenser lors d’une campagne électorale sera réduit de 11,5 millions $ à 8 millions.

Ça aurait pu être pire. La CAQ réclamait l’imposition d’un plafond de dépenses de 2 millions pour les années non-électorales et de 4 millions pour celles où les élections seraient tenues. Comme je l’écrivais il y a quelques jours, 2 millions de dollars, c’est une contribution de 20$ de la part de seulement 2% des électeurs. Toute contribution supplémentaire aurait été gaspillée avec un plafond aussi bas. Ce serait, selon moi une atteinte sérieuse à la liberté d’expression. Évidemment, un plafond de 8 millions pour une campagne électorale et, si je comprends bien, pas de plafond en dehors d’une campagne, c’est beaucoup moins grave.

Ce qui est grave, c’est le plafonnement de la contribution maximale à un parti à 100$ et l’accroissement concomitant de la dépendance  des partis politiques du financement public attribué en fonction de résultats électoraux. Je l’ai déjà dit ici, c’est une très mauvaise idée. Mais au-delà de la sagesse de cette mesure, la question qui se pose maintenant est celle de sa constitutionnalité.

On peut aborder cette question de deux points de vue, soit celui de l’électeur dont on limite la capacité de contribuer à un parti et celui de partis désavantagés par la réforme. Selon moi, la limitation de la contribution maximale dans le projet de loi 2 est anticonstitutionnelle, peu importe lequel de ce deux points de vue on adopte.

Du point de vue d’une personne qui veut contribuer à un parti, cette contribution représente une forme d’expression et de participation politique. Les arrêts de la Cour suprême dans Libman c. Québec (Procureur général), [1997] 3 R.C.S. 569, et Harper c. Canada (Procureur général), 2004 CSC 33, [2004] 1 R.C.S. 827, reconnaissent que dépenser de l’argent pour soutenir, dans un contexte référendaire ou électoral, une cause que l’on soutient est une forme d’expression protégée par l’art. 2(b) de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Certes, il y a certaines différences entre les faits de ces arrêts, qui mettaient en cause des restrictions sur le droit des “tiers,” c’est-à-dire de personnes ou groupes autres que les partis politiques, de dépenser pour participer au débat électoral, et ceux d’une hypothétique attaque contre le projet de loi 2. Cependant, à mon avis, ces différences sont sans conséquence. Par ailleurs, l’arrêt Figueroa c. Canada (Procureur général), 2003 CSC 37, [2003] 1 R.C.S. 912, reconnaît qu’une contribution à un parti politique est une forme de participation électorale protégée par l’art. 3 de la Charte.

Une limitation du droit de contribuer à un parti doit donc être justifiée en vertu de l’art. 1 de la Charte. Elle doit notamment être la mesure la moins restrictive possible pour atteindre un objectif gouvernemental “urgent et réel,” et les effets positifs doivent en dépasser les négatifs. L’objectif poursuivi par l’Assemblée nationale est celui de la minimisation de la corruption et du recours aux prêtes-noms par ceux qui veulent contourner la limite de contribution actuelle. Sauf que le recours aux prête-noms est déjà illégal et il est loin d’être clair que cette nouvelle mesure est nécessaire pour le prévenir. De plus, comme je l’écrivais dans mon précédent billet sur le sujet, elle risque de produire peu d’effets positifs et beaucoup d’effets pervers. Mais même au-delà d’effets pervers “non-anticipés,” ses effets directs sont sévères. Dans une année non-électorale, elle interdit à un citoyen de donner 2$ par semaine à un parti politique (ça revient à 104$ par année)! Elle discrimine aussi largement et sans bonne raison entre ceux qui souhaitent donner de leur temps à un parti ou le faire profiter de leur notoriété, et ceux qui préfèrent faire une contribution pécuniaire. La majorité de la Cour suprême a été très généreuse avec les justifications apportées par le gouvernement fédéral dans Harper, mais moins dans Figueroa. Je ne sais pas quelle serait sa décision ici, mais je n’ai aucun doute sur ce qu’elle devrait être.

Prenons maintenant le point de vue des partis engagés dans la compétition électorale. Comme le souligne Mike Pal dans un très intéressant article, “Breakdowns in the Democratic Process and the Law of Canadian Democracy,” les politiciens, une fois au pouvoir, sont fortement tentés de tout faire pour y rester, peu importe ce qu’en pense l’électorat. Une façon de le faire c’est d’éliminer ou, du moins, d’affaiblir les concurrents. La Cour suprême n’a pas toujours été très vigilante face à ce problème, mais elle devrait l’être. Elle l’a été, en fait, dans Figueroa, où elle a invalidé une série de mesures qui conféraient aux grands partis des avantages niés aux plus petits, dont le droit d’inscrire l’affiliation partisane de leurs candidats sur un bulletin de vote et celui d’émettre un reçu permettant d’obtenir un crédit d’impôt en échange de dons au parti. Le projet de loi 2 est une manifestation de la tendance des partis au pouvoir de s’y retrancher. En rendant les partis largement dépendants du financement public calculé en fonction du nombre de votes reçus à la dernière élection, il favorise les partis qui ont bien fait par le passé au détriment de partis nouveaux et de ceux qui ont eu une mauvaise performance. Il s’agit d’une distorsion sérieuse de la compétition électorale, et les tribunaux ne devraient pas la tolérer. (Comme je l’ai déjà noté, il s’agit également d’une injustice envers les citoyens,  puisque leurs impôts servent à financer les partis politiques sans égard à leur popularité réelle: ainsi, ces dernières années, les contribuables finançaient le PLQ bien plus que les autres partis, tout en exprimant, mois après mois, une insatisfaction croissante à son endroit.) Encore une fois, j’aurais tort de prétendre avoir la certitude quant à l’issue d’un recours devant les tribunaux qui, comme le note M. Pal, ont parfois été laxistes face à ce genre de “pannes du processus démocratique.” Cependant, à mon avis, envisagé du point de vue “structurel,” le système de financement des partis politiques créé par le projet de loi 2 est bel et bien anticonstitutionnel.

La peur du rôle de l’argent, pourtant essentiel, en politique et le désir de pureté des élus québécois sont irrationnels. Ils les ont amenés à vouloir adopter des mesures non seulement mal avisées, mais aussi contraires aux droits et libertés des citoyens et néfastes pour le processus démocratique.

Les limites de la pureté

Une nouvelle rapportée par Radio-Canada hier me permet de revenir, une fois de plus, sur la bêtise de l’obsession actuelle de la classe politique québécoise avec la limitation du rôle de l’argent en politique. Selon ce que rapporte Radio-Can, le député Jacques Duchesneau―qui avait, par le passé, refusé d’une façon très ostentatoire de solliciter des dons pour lui ou son parti, disant ne vouloir rien devoir à personne―a enregistré un message téléphonique « envoyé automatiquement à environ 1 million de foyers québécois pour solliciter un don de 20 $ pour la CAQ ».

Ce n’est pas tant le changement d’idée de M. Duchesneau qui m’intéresse. Il n’y a rien de mal à ce qu’un politicien change d’idée, du moins lorsque c’est une bonne direction, comme c’est le cas ici. Il faut croire qu’une fois élu, M. Duchesneau a réalisé que recevoir des dons, pour un parti politique, c’est se « donner les moyens pour faire le travail ».

Ce qui m’intéresse plutôt, c’est le conflit entre les autres positions toujours défendues par la CAQ et, surtout, par M. Duchesneau lui-même, et les conséquences espérées de son appel au « lancement populaire ». Dans le cadre de son combat contre l’argent en politique, la CAQ, comme le rapportait récemment La Presse, propose de limiter les dépenses des partis politiques à 2 millions par année, sauf pour les années électorales, pour lequelles la limite serait de 4 millions. Or, supposons qu’un foyer sur dix, parmi ceux contactés par M. Duchesneau, réponde à son appel et fasse un don de 20$. C’est 100 000 fois 20$, donc 2 millions. La limite de dépenses que la CAQ propose donc, pour une année non-électorale. Supposons alors qu’une seule personne de plus, réflexion faite, décide également de contribuer. Si les dépenses sont limitées suivant la proposition de la CAQ, le parti devra lui dire « Non, merci! ».

C’est certes beaucoup, 100 000 contributeurs à un parti politique. Mais pas tant que ça. C’est environ 2% du nombre total d’électeurs au Québec. C’est à peu près la proportion d’électeurs américains qui ont contribué à la campagne de Barack Obama cette année. Un objectif ambitieux pour un parti donc, mais réalisable. Et, bien sûr, si on accepte des dons de 50$ ou de 100$, sans parler de montants plus élevés, cela diminue d’autant le nombre de donateurs à aller chercher. Avec un don moyen de 50$ par année, le plafond serait atteint avec les dons de moins de 1% des électeurs.

Or, il y a quelque chose de pervers, selon moi, à imposer un plafond de dépenses si bas qu’un parti politique pourrait, de façon concevable, refuser des dons de ses partisans, même des dons de 20$, parce qu’il ne pourrait pas les dépenser. (Au mieux, le parti pourrait déposer ces dons dans un compte de banque pour se constituer une réserve pour une année de vaches maigres.) Malgré tout le mal qu’on dit ces temps-ci aux États-Unis de cette adéquation, une contribution à un parti politique est, selon moi, une façon d’exprimer une opinion politique, au même titre que, disons, écrire une lettre ouverte à un journal. En faisant en sorte que l’expression des citoyens qui contribuent à un parti politique reste sans conséquences possibles, le plafonnement de dépenses proposé par la CAQ porte atteinte à la liberté d’expression politique, pourtant au coeur de notre système démocratique.

La volonté de s’affranchir l’influence supposément néfaste de l’argent, le désir de pureté des politiciens québécois n’ont pas que des limites pratiques, comme celles que M. Duchesneau semble avoir découvert. Cette pureté tant souhaitée irait aussi à l’encontre de nos principes.

L’argent en politique

Depuis une dizaine de jours, des chroniqueurs de La Presse ont publié une série d’articles sur la diminution du montant maximal de don à un parti politique, proposée par le gouvernement du Parti Québécois. Après Vincent Marissal et Alain Dubuc, la plus récente intervention est celle de Lysiane Gagnon, ce matin. (C’est aussi la meilleure, car la plus complète.) Mme. Gagnon et ses collègues soutiennent que la limitation drastique de contributions autorisées n’est pas la bonne solution aux problèmes d’intégrité qui affectent le système politique québécois et qu’elle risque d’avoir des effets pervers. Ils ont raison.

Car si l’intégrité des politiciens est remise en cause, et que l’existence de liens trop étroits entre certains d’entre eux et certains de ceux qui ont contribué à leur caisse électorale semble acquise, ce n’est pas le seul fait de faire un don, même un don substantiel, à un parti politique qui trahit une intention corrompue.   Or, comme le souligne Mme. Gagnon,

dans l’époque hystérique où nous sommes, ceux qui osent donner à un parti politique sont soupçonnés des pires intentions, les politiciens étant, quant à eux, vus comme des criminels en puissance n’attendant que l’occasion d’être soudoyés. Jolie façon d’encourager l’engagement politique des citoyens!

Pourtant, on accepte bien qu’une personne donne son temps, son énergie ou son influence à la politique. On salue les militants qui font du porte-à-porte, on applaudit les artistes qui profitent de leur visibilité pour prendre des positions “engagées”. On ne les soupçonne pas, ainsi que les politiciens qui acceptent leur aide, de corruption. Pourquoi s’indigne-t-on face à ceux qui, pour leur part, veulent  contribuer financièrement à la promotion des idées qu’ils partagent?

Et, comme d’habitude, l’indignation ne résulte pas en une réponse intelligente. La limitation de la contribution maximale va probablement éliminer une forme de corruption―l’utilisation de prête-noms par des entreprises ou des particuliers pour contribuer plus que la limite légale. Cependant, dit Mme. Gagnon,

La minorité de donateurs mal intentionnés et d’organisateurs malhonnêtes saura bien s’organiser pour contourner la loi. L’argent liquide circulera clandestinement encore davantage qu’aujourd’hui.

Car l’utilisation de prête-noms est déjà illégale. Ceux qui y ont recours choisissent de contourner la loi. Il n’y aucune raison de croire que leur détermination à le faire diminuera. De la valse de prête-noms on passera à la valse des enveloppes brunes, non moins pernicieuse, mais peut-être encore plus difficile à détecter.

D’autres effets pervers des mesures proposées par le gouvernement sont aussi prévisibles. Mme. Gagnon les décrit bien:

Les campagnes de financement populaire ne sont pas qu’une affaire de gros sous. Elles permettent aux leaders de reprendre contact avec leur base et aux militants d’entrer en contact avec leurs députés. Elles favorisent un sentiment de solidarité et de responsabilité individuelle envers le parti qui véhicule vos convictions.

Un parti vivant exclusivement aux crochets de l’État deviendra vite une coquille vide.

La formule aura aussi pour effet de scléroser la vie politique. Les subventions étatiques étant calculées selon les résultats électoraux antérieurs, comment un nouveau parti pourrait-il naître s’il ne peut compter sur des contributions de sympathisants?

Le problème, en fait, s’étend au-delà des nouveaux partis. Le financement en fonction des résultats de la dernière élection favorise le parti au gouvernement aux dépens de ceux dans l’opposition, peu importe, du reste, sa popularité réelle. Ainsi, ces dernières années, les contribuables finançaient le PLQ bien plus que les autres partis, tout en exprimant, mois après mois, une insatisfaction croissante à son endroit.

La réduction de la contribution financière maximale à un parti politique fera donc plus de mal que de bien. Surtout, elle n’aidera pas à redonner le contrôle du système politique aux citoyens, plutôt qu’à un establishment trop à son aise, ce qui devrait pourtant être le but de toute réforme de ce système.

Don’t Try Again

The BC Court of Appeal recently delivered an important decision in the area of election law. The case, Reference Re Election Act (BC), 2012 BCCA 394, is the Court’s take on the provincial legislature’s attempt to respond to the Court’s earlier judgment in British Columbia Teachers’ Federation v. British Columbia (Attorney General), 2011 BCCA 408, which struck down the spending limits the legislature had imposed on so-called “third parties” for a “pre-campaign period” preceding general election campaigns.

Before the 2009 election, British Columbia did not limit the expenditures that “third parties”―that is, everyone except candidates and political parties―could incur during election campaigns. For that election, however, it imposed a limit of $150,000 on expenditures incurred not only during the official campaign period, but also during the 60-day “pre-campaign period” immediately preceding it. (Unlike at the federal level, in B.C. elections are held on fixed dates, so the timing of such a period is known in advance. Indeed fixed-date elections were the reason for the introduction of this restrictions―the legislature feared, apparently, that third parties would overwhelm the voters with their advertising in advance of an election, to compensate for their inability to do so during the actual election campaign.)

Trade unions―the main victims of third-party spending restrictions in Canada, as I pointed out here―challenged these restrictions in Teachers’ Federation, and succeeded. The Court held that although the Supreme Court had upheld restrictions on third-party spending during a campaign period in Harper v. Canada (Attorney-General), 2004 SCC 33, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 827, the rationale of that decision could not be stretched to extend to a pre-campaign period, resulting in restrictions on political speech well beyond those held to be justifiable in Harper. For example, said the Court, these restrictions could apply to discussions of legislative debates if the legislature were sitting during the pre-campaign period.

Seizing on that example, the B.C. legislature sought to remedy the constitutional defect identified by the Court of Appeal by enacting amendments to third-party spending limits shortening the pre-campaign period to 40 days, and excluding from it any time within 21 days of the end of a sitting of the legislature. In other words, “the pre-campaign period may then be as long as 40 days or, depending on the length of a legislative sitting prior to an election, no time at all.  The limitations may apply from 28 to 68 days varying from one election to the next.” (Par. 18) These amendments were not proclaimed into force; rather the government decided to assure itself of their constitutionality by referring the question to the Court of Appeal.

It did well, because the Court was not impressed by the amendments. In a fairly brief decision, it pointed out that the issue was not whether the amendments were less restrictive than the rules struck down in Teachers’ Federation, but whether they were minimally impairing of freedom of expression, as required by s. 1 of the the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as interpreted by the Supreme Court: “[i]nterfering with the freedom of political expression must then be justifiable only where there are the clearest and most compelling reasons for doing so.” (Par. 25) This they were not, said the Court. The real problem identified by both the trial and the appellate judgments in Teachers’ Federation was that restrictions on third-party advertisements during the pre-campaign period were over-broad, because they applied to all sorts of communications, including those on issues not directly implicated in the election campaign. And so,

[g]iven that, insofar as they limit political expression in the pre-campaign period, this Court has held the [rules struck down in Teachers’ Federation] to be constitutionally invalid principally because of the overbreadth of the definition of election advertising, it is difficult to see on what basis the current amendments could be said to be constitutionally sound in respect to the same period when they contain essentially the same definition. (Par. 37)

The Court also observed that Harper did not resolve, or even address, the issue for the pre-campaign period, and the restrictions acceptable during the actual campaign are not so before. The government adduced no evidence to show that restrictions on third-party spending are necessary during the pre-campaign period, and so the amendments are not minimally impairing of freedom of expression, and are thus unconstitutional.

Although I am very skeptical of limits on third party spending, as I have already suggested on this blog, I suspect that this is a somewhat wilful, or at least wishful, interpretation of Harper. That case was decided in the context where the election date was not fixed, and, unlike the BC Court of Appeal, I think that its rationale can easily be stretched to apply to the pre-campaign period in that context. It is an unsound rationale, but that is a different matter. And in Harper, the majority did not care much for evidence of the necessity of spending limits. “Common sense” inferences were enough for it. Although the Court here pays lip service to that reasoning, I do not think it follows its spirit. Here too, it is a bad spirit, but it constitutes, until proof of the contrary, the Supreme Court’s position. I wonder if the BC government intends to appeal.

Pas de droit de réplique

J’ai déjà écrit quelques billets sur l’effet réel des restrictions sur le droit des citoyens, d’organisations ou des groupes, autres que les candidats et les partis politiques, de dépenser de l’argent pour prendre part au débat public pré-électoral. Comme j’ai souligné ici et ici, au Canada, ce sont surtout des syndicats qui se sont heurté à ces restrictions. Le mouvement étudiant aussi a dû s’ajuster pour respecter ces restrictions, comme je l’avais prévu dans cette chronique. Bref, plutôt que de limiter le pouvoir des riches, ces lois empêchent de s’exprimer ceux qui, sans être riches (voire même aisés) individuellement, sont en mesure de réunir des fonds assez considérables en agissant collectivement.

Ce matin, Radio-Canada décrivait une autre conséquence de ces restrictions. Le Directeur général des élections envisage, selon ce reportage, de poursuivre Yves Michaud pour avoir fait publié dans le Devoir une publicité appelant les électeurs à défaire certains députés, de tous les principaux partis. Il leur en veut d’avoir voté, il y a douze ans, en faveur d’une motion de blâme à son endroit après qu’il eut fait une déclaration que tous les membres de l’Assemblée nationale avaient jugée antisémite. Or, l’article 413 de la Loi électorale interdit à quiconque n’est pas un agent officiel d’un candidat ou d’un parti d’engager, durant la campagne électorale, des dépenses visant à favoriser ou à défavoriser l’élection d’un candidat. M. Michaud est un simple citoyen et non l’agent officiel de qui que ce soit, alors à première vue, il semble effectivement avoir enfreint la loi.

M. Michaud n’est certes pas très sympathique. Mais, tout comme avec les syndicats et les carrés rouges, qu’on peut ne pas trouver sympathiques non plus, là n’est pas la question. Si peu sympathique soit-il, est-il juste de lui interdire de s’exprimer en période électorale? Il est vrai, il a le droit de faire publier une lettre ouverte, ou encore de s’exprimer sur internet, à condition, dans les deux cas, de ne pas payer pour la transmission de son message. Mais internet, ce n’est pas encore pour tout le monde. Quant à publier une lettre ouverte, une homme odieux, ou un homme qui poursuit une vendetta essentiellement personnelle – et a fortiori celui qui, comme M. Michaud, est les deux – risque de ne pas s’attirer la sympathie d’une rédaction qui, après tout, dispose d’un espace limité pour publier le courrier des lecteurs.

Une opinion impopulaire peut être difficile à exprimer. Mais – c’est la beauté du système capitaliste – une opinion qu’un journal ne veut pas propager à ses frais peut quand même être diffusée – à titre de publicité payante. M. Michaud était donc prêt à payer pour faire diffuser son opinion impopulaire. Mais bien sûr, cette opinion, c’est que certains députés sont, selon les termes de sa publicité, “indignes d’être élus”, il voulait la diffuser, justement, en période électorale. Ce que la loi lui interdit.

Quel est donc l’effet de cette interdiction dans ces circonstances? Ce n’est pas, je soupçonne, d’empêcher la richesse de subvertir le processus démocratique. La publicité a dû coûter quelques milliers de dollars à peine, elle étai dirigée contre des candidats des trois  principaux partis, elle ne visait ni à protéger les riches d’une redistribution de la richesse ni à s’attirer les faveurs du prochain gouvernement. C’est, plutôt, d’empêcher la diffusion d’un message qui est, à la fois, impopulaire et inextricablement lié à une élection. C’est de faire en sorte qu’un citoyen qui se sent attaqué par une décision des législateurs n’est pas libre de leur répliquer sur la place publique au moment où les autres citoyens, et donc les législateurs, sont les plus susceptibles de l’écouter.

La diffusion des idées impopulaires, le libre choix électoral et la possibilité pour les citoyens de critiquer ceux qui les gouvernent sont au coeur de la protection de la liberté d’expression. La Loi électorale québécoise ne fait pas que baliser ce droit. Elle y est une atteinte profonde.

Bad Timing

In an interesting story yesterday, the Globe and Mail reported that “British Columbia’s largest public-sector union is appealing a fine of more than $3-million levied by Elections BC over a television advertisement that aired during the spring by-elections.” The union started an ad campaign three days before the by-elections were called. As the article tells the story – mostly with the Union’s perspective – the ad had nothing to do with the specific by-elections; it was directed against the provincial government’s policy towards civil servants in general. But since it disfavoured the party in government, opposing its stance on issues with which it is associated, it counted as election advertising. The union eventually cancelled the ad in the ridings in which the by-elections were taking place, but it had run for four days, which, in the view of Elections BC, was enough to violate the very low spending limits for individual ridings.

The union now says that Elections BC misjudged the amount of its spending (and thus of the fine, which is a multiple of the amount by which it broke the spending limit), counting its province-wide expenses for the duration of the ad campaign as expenses on the specific by-elections. That sounds like a reasonable complaint, but the article does not explain the view Elections BC, and I have not been able to find its decision on its website, so I will not express a definitive opinion.

In any event, this story is an illustration of a trend about which I blogged before. It is that restrictions on spending by “third parties” – that is citizens, unions, NGOs and anyone else except political parties and candidates – are, in Canada, working mostly not to the detriment not of the rich, whose influence they were intended to check, but of the not-so-rich who are able to wield considerable resources by organizing. It is mostly unions, as I noted here, but also, in Québec, the student movement. Another important point is that, as I pointed out in this op-ed about the impact of third-party spending restrictions on the Québec student movement, beginning an election campaign – which in most Canadian jurisdictions the first minister can do practically at will – can effectively silence an ongoing social movement or debate. What this case shows is that a general election might not even be necessary. A well-timed and strategically placed by-election can do the trick.

I suppose I will have occasion to blog about this case again, and probably similar ones too. In the meantime, we would do well to think again about whether our election-spending framework is actually a good thing for our democracy.

Non, c’est non!

Mardi, j’écrivais au sujet de la demande d’injonction présentée par le chef d’Option Nationale, Jean-Martin Aussant, pour contraindre les télédiffuseurs qui organisent les débats des chefs en vue des élections du 4 septembre prochain à l’inviter à faire partie de ses débats. Le juge Jean-François Émond de la Cour supérieure du Québec a rendu sa décision, Aussant c. Société Radio-Canada, 2012 QCCS 3872. Comme je le prévoyais, il a rejeté la demande de M. Aussant.

Comme la demande vise une injonction interlocutoire, c’est-à-dire rendue avant la tenue d’un débat complet sur le fond de la question, M. Aussant doit démontrer qu’il a un droit apparent, qu’il subirait un préjudice irréparable en cas de rejet de la demande, que l’octroi de l’injonction causerait moins d’inconvénients aux télédiffuseurs que ne lui en causerait le rejet, et que la situation est urgente. L’essentiel du débat, cependant, porte sur l’apparence de droit.

Là-dessus, le premier argument de M. Aussant était fondé sur l’article 423 de la Loi électorale, en vertu duquel

[e]n période électorale, tout radiodiffuseur, télédiffuseur ou câblodistributeur ainsi que tout propriétaire de journal, périodique ou autre imprimé peut mettre gratuitement à la disposition des chefs des partis et candidats du temps d’émission à la radio ou à la télévision ou de l’espace dans le journal, le périodique ou autre imprimé, pourvu qu’il offre un tel service de façon équitable, qualitativement et quantitativement, à tous les candidats d’une même circonscription ou à tous les chefs des partis représentés à l’Assemblée nationale ou qui ont recueilli au moins 3% des votes valides lors des dernières élections générales.

Le juge Émond note que cet argument avait déjà été rejeté par la Cour d’appel (ainsi que par la Cour supérieure). Il rejette les prétentions de M. Aussant, selon qui cette décision “ne tient pas la route” (par. 33). L’historique législatif de la Loi électorale, que M. Aussant avait invoqué au soutien de ses prétentions, ne les appuie pas. (Le juge Émond ne cite pas les commentaires ministériels en cause.)

Le deuxième argument de M. Aussant était fondé sur la liberté d’expression. Comme l’observe le juge Émond, cet argument, lui-aussi, a déjà été considéré par les tribunaux, qui l’ont rejeté, le plus récemment dans  May v. CBC/Radio-Canada, 2011 FCA 130, au par. 25 (citant Trieger v. Canadian Broadcasting Corp., (1988), 54 D.L.R. (4th) 143 (ONSC)).

Le dernier argument de M. Aussant était que les télédiffuseurs ne l’avaient pas invité en raison de ses prises de positions, et que, ce faisant, ils ont violé sa liberté d’opinion. Le juge Émond considère que cette prétentions est sans fondement. Il n’existe aucune preuve de ce que l’exclusion de M. Aussant aurait été motivée par ses opinions. De plus, il n’est même pas clair que la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne s’applique aux télédiffuseurs, régis par le droit fédéral. C’est un bon point, qui m’avait échappé lorsque j’avais considéré le fond de la question ici. Peccavi. (La réponse dépendrait de l’application des règles sur les immunités inter-juridictionnelles, que j’ai récemment décrites ici.) Par ailleurs, il s’appliquerait avec autant de force au droit à la liberté d’expression.

Bref, le moins qu’on puisse dire, conclut le juge Émond, c’est que le droit de M. Aussant de contraindre les télédiffuseurs à l’inviter aux débats des chefs n’est pas apparent. Cela suffit pour conclure au rejet de sa demande d’injonction interlocutoire. De plus, le juge souligne que la prépondérance des inconvénients ne favorise pas M. Aussant, puisque l’octroi de l’injonction qu’il recherche, à quelques jours des débats, pourrait causer des problèmes majeurs aux télédiffuseurs.

En principe, un jugement sur une requête en injonction interlocutoire ne dispose pas du fond du litige. M. Aussant est libre de poursuivre sa demande. Certes, le débat aura eu lieu sans lui, et les télédiffuseurs pourraient soutenir que la demande est donc devenue purement théorique. Cependant, les tribunaux pourraient exercer leur pouvoir discrétionnaire de l’entendre quand même, puisque la question est importante et qu’elle risque de se poser de nouveau lors de prochaines élections. Il s’agit de savoir si M. Aussant a envie de poursuivre le débat, vu le rejet sans équivoque de ses arguments quant au fond de la question.